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        Recipes

        PORK LOIN AND WHITE BEAN STEW WITH CHEDDAR AND PEPPER BISCUITS AND CHICORY AND EGG SALAD

        PORK LOIN AND WHITE BEAN STEW WITH CHEDDAR AND PEPPER BISCUITS AND CHICORY AND EGG SALAD

        A MAGICAL ECONOMY OF TIME AND MONEY: PORK LOIN STEW WITH WHITE BEANS, FENNEL, AND SHALLOTS

        This recipe makes pork loin the star of the show — and that also makes it beautifully economical. Plus it’s quick, with only about 5-6 steps before you walk away and pour that glass of wine.

        Our recipes make a great meal. The stew is the star, with sumptuous white beans surrounding a delicious (and affordable) pork loin. And add to that freshly baked cheddar pepper biscuits and the chickory salad for a gorgeous meal you, friends, and family will ask for again and again.

        Our recipes make a great meal. The stew is the star, with sumptuous white beans surrounding a delicious (and affordable) pork loin. And add to that freshly baked cheddar pepper biscuits and the chickory salad for a gorgeous meal you, friends, and family will ask for again and again.

        PORK AND WHITE BEAN STEW

        INGREDIENTS

        • 1 pork loin cut into 3-inch steaks and seasoned well with kosher salt and black pepper on all sides.

        • 5 whole peeled shallots cut into 1/3’s

        • 1 whole head fennel trimmed, and the bulb end removed and the whole bulb cut into slivers

        • 5 cloves garlic smashed and chopped

        • 3 cans excellent quality white beans

        • 1 cup low sodium chicken stock-up to 2 cups if you want a more soupy dish

        • 1 bunch fresh thyme tied with kitchen string

        • 1 handful flat leaf parsley

        PROCEDURE

        In your EuroCAST square sauté pan (or any of our deeper sauté pans):

        When you’re done with this recipe, kick back to enjoy a bit of EuroCAST TV.

        1. Warm 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat

        2. Sauté shallots and fennel until shallots are slightly browned and translucent. This will be mouth-wateringly fragrant. Give the air a sniff and be ready to swoon.

        3. Remove shallots and fennel to a bowl with the oil (which is now infused with amazing flavor)

        4. In the same sauté pan, add 3 tablespoons olive oil and the pork, on medium-high heat suitable for browning

        5. Brown pork on all sides, including the tops and bottoms, about 2 minutes on each side. You want a hard sear to create and lock in flavor.

        6. After browning, remove the pork and wipe out the skillet. (This is where our cookware shines. It keeps you moving with fewer pans and less cleaning.)

        7. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil and gently sauté the garlic, about 2 minutes

        8. Turn down the heat to medium-low

        9. Add the pork back to the pan, and add the beans, thyme and vegetables

        10. Immediately add 1 cup of the stock

        11. Let all this simmer very gently until the pork is slightly pink (it’ll finish cooking in the resting time), or cooked through if that’s your preference

        Taste the soup and the beans for seasoning.

        Garnish with flat leaf parsley and black pepper.

        About the white beans: You want to use all the contents of the can. The liquid is a gorgeous thing you can use to thicken stews. It's even been used by top chefs (who call this liquid aquafaba) as a replacement for egg whites and to create fancy foams. It's what helps make this stew so sensual.

        Serving suggestion

        Depending on how soupy your result is, you can ladle into bowls, or use a rimmed plate.

        To accompany the stew, bring over the extra biscuits (see my biscuit recipe below) to sop up all that gorgeous, aromatic broth.

        Photo Apr 24, 3 47 24 PM.jpg

        CHICKORY AND EGG SALAD

        This salad is way more about composition than it is about formality.

        At the time I’m writing this Recipe of the Week, romaine lettuce is having a tough time at the store thanks to the threat of a bug (the CDC is keeping an eye out for our health). So ...

        Let’s eat chicory! 

        Photo Apr 24, 3 47 44 PM.jpg

        Chicory, also called endive, is so crunchy and wonderfully flavorful, you won’t need much of a dressing to enjoy them. And I think they’re beautiful.

        • 4 spears endive separated

        • 1 large head radicchio separated

        • Toss with some pitted green olives.

        • 4 or more hard boiled or jammy eggs (that's a link to our Recipe of the Week featuring lamb with mint sauce, jammy eggs, and orzo salad -- but don't get distracted, people)

        • 1 coarsely chopped handful of flat leaf parsley. That’s sometimes merchandised as Italian parsley. (Please do not use curly parsley. Don’t even get me started on that.)

        • About a dozen anchovy filets. Some people are a bit afraid of anchovies. Don’t be. They are Harry Potter-like in their magic. Maybe more so.

        • Some little goat cheese chunks on top, please.

        For the dressing

        • 3 T best quality olive oil

        • Juicy squeeze of 1/4 lemon

        • Kosher salt

        • Black pepper

        • Crushed red pepper flakes

        I confess to you: I am eating this salad as I write this. It is so good.

        WHITE CHEDDAR AND BLACK PEPPER BISCUITS

        Photo Apr 24, 3 47 04 PM.jpg

        You can either make these as loose, joyous drop biscuits that wind up looking like miniature Everests, all mounded and craggy and pepper-flecked — or you can make these like I did here, taking out your day’s concerns with a zen-like relationship to dough and roller.

        Why did I choose the path of zen?  Because the world is kookoo and I think taking time to slow down, is always a good thing.  

        So, I rolled out these biscuits because it restored some order to my universe, and let me focus on the simple things. 

        But if you’re feeling like mounded, craggy, pepper-flecked Everests, have at it, my friend. 

        PROCEDURE

        This recipe calls for white cheddar cheese. You can use whatever cheese you’d like. I like the whip-sharp bite of extra sharp cheddar. I also like the color white over the color yellow. (I guess if I’m imagining the drop-biscuit version as little Mt. Everests, I can avoid wondering why the snow is yellow. #sorrynotsorry)

        Special surprise. Unless you already clicked all around this post, in which case, you'll recognize where you've landed.

        1. Preheat your oven to 400F. For biscuits I position the rack in the third position, but your oven may vary.

        2. Rapidly cut into small cubes 10 tablespoons of very cold, unsalted butter, until they are pea-sized.

        Add the butter to the bowl of a food processor along with:

        • 2 cups all purpose flour

        • 1 T baking powder

        • 1 tsp kosher salt

        • 1/2 -1 T finely cracked black pepper

        • 1 cup grated sharp white cheddar cheese

         Pulse this until well-incorporated and floury pea-sized pebbles form. Don’t over-process.

        Now, with the blade running, add in a stream:

        • 3/4 cup whole milk, plus 1-2 tablespoons if needed for moisture and texture.

        The dough should remain a little wet.

        Now comes the alchemy.

        1. Mound the biscuits into 8 equal portions on your EuroCAST griddle

        2. Brush with beaten egg and sprinkle with kosher salt

        3. Bake until golden brown, depending on your oven approximately 15 minutes.

        Test for doneness by sticking a toothpick into the center. If it comes out clean, you’re good.

        Eat them. I like a hot pepper jelly with them when I’m eating them by themselves.

        And, of course, serve them with the pork and white bean stew.

        SPATCHCOCKED CHICKEN AND TURMERIC MARINADE WITH BASMATI JEWELED RICE

        SPATCHCOCKED CHICKEN AND TURMERIC MARINADE WITH BASMATI JEWELED RICE

        STRAPPED FOR TIME? MAKE THESE SAUCES FOR POURING OVER A SUPER-FAST CHICKEN.

        Photo May 01, 12 25 24 PM web.jpg

        These are all takes on traditional Middle Eastern sauces and spices. My kids and I eat a lot of food inspired by the Middle East, because their dishes are fresh, beautiful, and full of wonderful flavors. These sauces are not too exotic — I know these combinations will delight you.

        These three sauces turn your chicken and rice menu into a journey. Pack your bags, open the mind, breathe in.

        As for the chicken (fast to cook because you've had the butcher spatchcock it), the recipe awaits at the end of this post, because of the turmeric thing we're doing -- oh, but I'm getting ahead of myself. Patience, my pretties. 

        GARLIC PASTE

        That's the garlic paste nestled into the EuroCAST double roaster top in the photo above. You will want this, trust me. Time to get epic.

        INGREDIENTS

        • 20-25 fresh garlic cloves

        • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

        • 1-1/2 cups grape seed oil

        • 4 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

        PROCEDURE

        1. In your food processor, pulse the garlic and salt together until it is minced, about 10 seconds

        2. Add 1/2 cup grapeseed oil and pulse a few times. Scrape down the sides with a spatula, Repeat with another 1/2 cup of grapeseed oil.

        3. With the final 1/2 cup of grapeseed oil, turn on the motor and slowly drizzle it until a relatively smooth paste is formed.

        4. Add in the fresh lemon juice. One final pulse to incorporate.

        5. When done, spoon it into a glass bowl and cover it in the fridge for a few hours before you bring out the chicken. It will mellow in the bowl.

        As you’re processing this, it will light your nose hairs on fire.

        OK, not really, like, light them on fire. But zing zing zing go the nose hairs. 

        Lucky for you, the paste does chill out in the fridge with time, to become the loveliest pale treat on the table. You will be in awe of this simple paste on that juicy chicken. 

        MASTER GREEN SAUCE

        This one is spicy and aromatic and the gorgeous visual foil for the pale beauty of the garlic paste. It is called a "master" for many reasons, which I will not go into here.

        You could buy this at your local grocery store (they have something similar at my friend the Trader named Joe), but there’s no need. You can make it in a flash yourself. Then it’s super-fresh.  And — since you’ve already got the food processor out making that pale, beautiful garlic paste — you’re ready to roll.

        Photo May 01, 12 31 38 PM web.jpg

        INGREDIENTS

        • 2 cups firmly packed fresh flat leaf (Italian) parsley. None of that curly stuff. I don’t mind the stalks and stems if you clean them of grit and dry them well.

        • 1 cup cilantro leaves

        • 2 - 3 Serrano peppers

        • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

        • 1 cup olive oil

        PROCEDURE

        You know the drill. As Peter Noone of Herman’s Hermits might yell, “Second verse, same as the first!”

        Whirl that baby up using the procedure much like we used for the garlic paste:

        Photo May 01, 12 25 01 PM web.jpg
        1. In your food processor, pulse the ingredients about 10 seconds

        2. Add 1/2 cup grapeseed oil and pulse a few times. Scrape down the sides with a spatula, Repeat with another 1/2 cup of grapeseed oil.

        3. With the final 1/2 cup of grapeseed oil, turn on the motor and slowly drizzle it. This makes it smooth as silk.

        4. When done, spoon it into a glass bowl and cover it in the fridge.

        POMEGRANATE SALSA

        This is beautiful right out of the gate -- but here's a tip.  The tomatoes are delicate once exposed to air, so use within 3 days -- and in between uses, keep it tightly covered in the refrigerator (you can press cling wrap directly onto the sauce to keep all air out) until ready to serve.

        Photo May 01, 12 31 27 PM web.jpg

        INGREDIENTS

        • 4 ripe plum tomatoes. You want them just firm enough to hold up but ripe in that they are sweet and not pithy.

        • 1/2 cup chopped red onion

        • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

        PROCEDURE

        1. Pulse the above until just chunky, don’t overdo it here. You're making a salsa, not a smooth sauce. (Hey, variety!)

        2. Remove from the bowl of the processor and pour into a clean glass serving bowl. Add:

        • 2 T. pomegranate molasses (you can find this at Whole Foods, really good delis, and Persian markets — and you should always have it on hand, it will open up your world)

        • 1 T. sherry vinegar

        • 2 teaspoon Aleppo flakes

        • 1-1/2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

        Stir to incorporate.

        SPATCHCOCKED CHICKEN AND TURMERIC MARINADE

        DSC_2834-web.jpg

        For the marinade

        I love this turmeric marinade on chicken. It's envelopes the chicken in a wonderful, wild color that only the good goddesses could conjure. It’s marigold and umber all in one.

        I use this recipe and use just 1/2 for the marinade. The other half I cover immediately and reserve for the table so we can drizzle it on the chicken after it's roasted and presented. 

        It is critical that the sauce you set aside for dipping never gets close to your raw chicken. Handle your food well and your food will handle you well.

        INGREDIENTS

        • 1 cup grape seed oil

        • 1/4 cup olive oil

        • 1-1/2 cups fresh cilantro leaves

        • 15 garlic cloves, as fresh as possible, although I do admit to buying those enormous bags of air blasted cloves from time to time. They are a godsend as time-savers. But. Fresh. Is. Always. Best. (Yes, that’s a bumper sticker on my car.)

        • 3 Tablespoons ground turmeric

        • 1/2 Tablespoon kosher salt

        • 1 teaspoon Aleppo flake

        • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

        PROCEDURE

        Yes, yes, y'all! Back to the food processor! 

        1. Throw everything in and pulse it 10-15 times.

        2. Pour 1/2 into a clean bowl and let it set.

        3. Place that half on the table with the other lovely sauces upon serving.

        The other half? See the chicken recipe below. 

        For the chicken

        Have your butcher trim the back bone out on both sides, split the sternum and pack it up flat. That’s how you’ll cook it. (This technique is the “spatchcocking”.)

        PROCEDURE

        The time you have to marinate the chicken is what it is. Adjust as needed.

        1. Salt and pepper the underside of the bird, flip the bird over (see what I did there), and place in your EuroCAST Double Roaster top.

        2. Pour over 1/2 of the turmeric marinade and cover the chicken with cling wrap.

        3. Ideally it will soak in that turmeric treasure for 2-8 hours in the refrigerator. Or, if you are massively whacked for spare time, marinate as long as it takes to pre-heat the oven. It’ll still be gorgeously marigold in color.

        4. Pre-heat the oven to 475F.

        5. Roast that chick for 24-35 minutes, or until juices run clear when you poke them with the tip of a knife or sharp fork.

        If you didn't marinade too long, it's all OK. You’ll be able to amp up the chicken's flavor with the extra sauce you’ve squirreled away from the turmeric recipe.

        Photo May 01, 12 25 19 PM web.jpg

        BASMATI JEWELED RICE

        You will love love love this. And it's gorgeous. 

        IMG_1750 web.jpeg

        INGREDIENTS

        • 2 cups basmati rice

        • 1 white onion, about 1 cup diced

        • 1 tsp kosher salt

        • 3 T unsalted butter

        • 1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro (both the leaves and the top of their stems)

        In a bowl, assemble: 

        • 1/2 cup sliced dried figs

        • 1/2 cup dried cherries

        • 1/2 cup finely sliced dried apricots

        In another bowl, mix together: 

        • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

        • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom

        • 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

        • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

        • 1 teaspoon ground cumin

        In another bowl, assemble:

        • 1/3 cup toasted slivered almonds

        • 1/3 cup toasted smashed pistachios

        PROCEDURE

        In your large EuroCAST Dutch oven, or square sauté pan:

        1. Melt the butter

        2. Season with 1 teaspoon kosher salt

        3. Sauté the onions until they just begin to turn translucent

        4. Add basmati rice

        5. Add 3 cups water (vegan version), or excellent quality chicken stock and cook until just al dente, 18-20 minutes.

        6. Now that the rice is just al dente (not yet soft), add 1 cup water plus figs, cherries, and apricots

        7. Let this cook together until the rice has softened completely and the dried fruit has been gently steamed by the heat.

        8. Remove from heat and add cinnamon, cardamom, allspice, black pepper, and cumin

        9. Mix well, cover, and let set to wed the flavors.

        Taste for seasonings. You might want a bit more salt, a bit more cinnamon — maybe a little red pepper flake?

        Before serving, stir in the almonds and pistachios. Top with cilantro. And, to make it epic, drizzle with a best-quality olive oil.

         

        ABOUT CLEAN-UP

        See that photo below? What's special about it? Here's my thought.. 

        Photo May 01, 12 39 22 PM.jpg

        You could bring that gorgeous square sauté pan straight to the table. And isn't that double roaster lid a great looking thing for your table? Use EuroCAST-friendly serving tools (wood is my favorite).

        You can save cooking time with the spatchcocked chicken, and you can save clean-up time by serving things beautifully on the table right in your EuroCAST. 

        Really, you need to stop washing so many dishes. 

        HALLOWEEN AND DAY OF THE DEAD MENU IDEAS

        HALLOWEEN AND DAY OF THE DEAD MENU IDEAS

        HALLOWEEN AND DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATIONS START HERE. DON’T BE AFRAID.

        We're here for you as you battle the season's zombies and tackle the season’s celebrations. We’ve got party ideas for Halloween and for the holiday that follows, The Day of the Dead (Spanish: Dia de Muertos), the Mexican holiday celebrated throughout the world - we’ve got some party ideas there too.

        Let's get to it, shall we, the spirits await!  

        Photo Oct 07, 2 42 24 PM.jpg

        Whether you're serving children of age 6, 36, or 60, it's time to blend in a lot of fun, and a bit of funk, into this macabre celebration. It’s a fantastic time to put masks on your face, and great food in your mouth. Check out our Day of the Dead ideas below which give you even more excuses to eat great food all week long.

        In Mexican culture, death is viewed as a natural part of the human cycle. Mexicans view it not as a day of sadness but as a day of celebration because their loved ones awake and celebrate with them. (Wikipedia)

        In Mexican culture, death is viewed as a natural part of the human cycle. Mexicans view it not as a day of sadness but as a day of celebration because their loved ones awake and celebrate with them. (Wikipedia)

        For Halloween. The keys to a great Halloween party are simple, explosive food (not literally exploding food ... but now that we think about it ...); freshly made, age-appropriate libations; plenty of themed napkins; and lots of little, nutty, crazy touches like pumpkins and fake cobwebs around the table and house to put people in the mood. 

        For Day of the Dead. Here are some ideas for day of the dead: Store bought enchiladas with a roasted yellow pepper salsa. Roasted sweet potatoes on dark greens with crumbled cotija and candied walnuts. Fried tortillas and a fresh whipped guacamole. Oaxacan Hot Chocolate. Pan de muerto and the ever popular Sugar Skull.

        As for what to eat -- we've got you covered (and not in spooky slime) with our recipes for putting on a great party for Halloween and Day of the Dead.

        Dinner made easy with store bought enchiladas and this easy homemade roasted yellow pepper with a raw spicy salad.

        Dinner made easy with store bought enchiladas and this easy homemade roasted yellow pepper with a raw spicy salad.

        MACABRE MENU FOR ALL HALLOWS EVE

        Put food around, and don't mind if it all looks a bit scary or chaotic. People coming over (prior to tricking and treating, or after, or even during) are not focused on anything formal. Keep it fun, delicious, and simple. Except for store-bought candy, our menu can be made in EuroCAST cookware, so do yourself a frightening favor and don't make your Halloween about the cleanup. 

        • Chicken drumettes

        • Steak sliders

        • Pan cake

          Bread knots

        • Cheese tray

        The strategy is obvious. Some things sweet, some savory, all accessible to fingers (or if you're wearing gorilla gloves, toothpicks), all small bites that put the treat in trick-or-treat. 

        You will take her coveted EuroCAST Dutch oven from her only by taking it from her cold, dead hands. Which, at this point, looks like it's completely doable.

        You will take her coveted EuroCAST Dutch oven from her only by taking it from her cold, dead hands. Which, at this point, looks like it's completely doable.

        Photo Oct 23, 5 41 16 PM.jpg

        CHICKEN DRUMETTES

        5 pounds equals about 30-32 pieces. 

        1. In a single layer, lay the drumettes on a cookie sheet or -- for faster cleanup and lovely cooking -- in your EuroCAST double roaster's top.

        2. Drizzle with olive oil, and spread over top a good seasoning of kosher salt and ground black pepper.

        3. Roast in your oven at 450 degrees F until golden, about 15 minutes.

        4. Remove from heat and add to one of the sauces below. They are all favorites in my family, so you can't go wrong making any -- or all -- of them. Toss and serve in one of these sauces, or your own ghoulishly clever Halloween sauce.

        Boo-cover.jpg

        GATES TO HELL SAUCE (A RAP-SCALLION'S DREAM)

        • 1/2 cup melted butter

        • 1/4 cup Tabasco or similar hot sauce

        • 1 scallion, minced fine

        Stir well until completely incorporated.

        SWEET DEATH (FOR A WITCH'S TOAST)

        • 1 cup fig or other fruit-filled jelly

        • 1 jalepeno, minced fine

        Process these two ingredients in the food processor and you're done.

        GRAVEYARD GREEN SAUCE (FRANKENSTEIN'S FAVORITE WHEN VISITING CANCUN)

        Tomatillo sauce. Check out this link for my tomatillo sauce. 

        STEAK SLIDERS TO DIE FOR (DON'T WORRY, THEY CAN ALSO BRING YOU BACK TO LIFE)

        I love Meryl Streep. In the hilariously gruesome movie, Death Becomes Her, she ends up with a hole in her tummy. 

        Here's something that might have filled it. 

        Photo Oct 16, 4 06 34 PM.jpg

        DEATH BECOMES YOU STEAK SLIDERS WITH FRESH CAUGHT EEL

        That's what you put on the placard near these beauties. There's really no eel in it. (That might come with a sushi posting in the future.)

        These steak sliders are simply some perfect steak with peppers and onions. 

        Here’s the story: 

        1. Acquire slider buns or mini hot dog buns. When you're ready to assemble the sliders, fill with a smear of the very best mayo and a combo of steak and peppers and onions.

        2. For the steak, put flank steak on your Eurocast grill pan and grill it to desired doneness (in the spirit of Halloween, please leave some pink at least).

        3. Let the steak rest for a good 15 minutes while you cook the veggies in the next step. Once the steak has rested, slice that steak super-thin with a great, sharp knife.

        4. Don’t clean that skillet. It's filled with flavor. Now add 3 T. olive oil, then add one sliced white onion and a whole, thinly sliced sliced red pepper. Sauté till soft -- some like it very soft.

        5. Layer the steak and peppers with the onions and eat until you're on death's door! Or at least until you fill that hole in your Meryl Streep-like tummy.

        MOANING MYRTLE CHEESE TRAY

        For you Harry Potter fans, here is a cheese tray fit for your favorite ghost. 

        Grab your biggest cheese board, or, to be clever, get a nice piece of plywood and cover it with wax paper. It's surprisingly beautiful and so easy to clean up. 

        A cheese board demands variety, not just to please everyone's palette, but because real cheese lovers (raising my hand) like to go among different cheese to compare and contrast. It's like dating but with dairy products. 

        Pick 2-3 cheeses, minimum. Get something:

        • Ooey and gooey.

        • Stinky.

        • Hard smoked.

        • And one that the little monsters will eat and not spit out in your martini.

        Fruit, veggies, and cheese go together like Dracula and Vampirella and Renfield. Or like Abbott & Costello and Frankenstein and Dracula and the Mummy and whoever was in that movie. Vincent Price sort of appears at the end. 

        Plan for little grabs that require no removal of your gorilla gloves. 

        So, for fruit and veggies: Single bites like berries, grapes, grape tomatoes (they're a bit sweeter than cherry tomatoes) and baby carrots;  and a separate board for cut apples and stone fruits. Include a good knife and a pit bowl for the cherries. And napkins.

        A classic cheese board full of delights. Be generous. Even a scorpion or two makes for a little variety (just kidding ... boo!)

        A classic cheese board full of delights. Be generous. Even a scorpion or two makes for a little variety (just kidding ... boo!)

        There’s nothing better for any party than a bowl of amazing nuts. Find out more about our recipe @ our Instagram page. click on the image to go there now.

        There’s nothing better for any party than a bowl of amazing nuts. Find out more about our recipe @ our Instagram page. click on the image to go there now.

        Your favorite cake recipe -- or even a reliable cake mix! -- works perfectly in the EuroCAST grill pan. This one is vanilla spice with cream cheese frosting covered in black sprinkles and lots of “I see you" eyes. Nothing like lots of delicious cake with a side of paranoia for Halloween.

        Your favorite cake recipe -- or even a reliable cake mix! -- works perfectly in the EuroCAST grill pan. This one is vanilla spice with cream cheese frosting covered in black sprinkles and lots of “I see you" eyes. Nothing like lots of delicious cake with a side of paranoia for Halloween.

        BREAD KNOTS THAT DISAPPEAR LIKE THE INVISIBLE MAN

        Here's a fun experiment: Put these bread knots out on your table with a little placard marking them as Baby Brains Bread Knots. Watch to see which parent eats them voraciously. 

        Baby Brains Bread Knots

        Check out your grocery store's freezer section to make these knots. Look for frozen, uncooked bread dough. Buy it. Thaw it ... and then you can turn it into all sorts of delightful treats, including these baby brains. I mean, bread knots. 

        1. 1 loaf frozen uncooked bread dough, thawed, and cut into 10-12 pieces.

        2. Roll each piece into a long snake and tie into knots.

        3. Place on parchment lined cookie sheet or your EuroCAST griddle (I have the biggest griddle -- it's awesome for this)

        4. Repeat as needed

        5. Drizzle with olive oil and cover with another piece of wax paper.

        6. Let sit to rise in a warm place till almost doubled, about 40 minutes

        In the meantime, preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

        Then, when the doubling is done, brush the knots with 7 tablespoons melted unsalted butter. 

        Sprinkle with: 

        • Kosher salt

        • Garlic powder

        • Dried parsley

        Cook till browned and puffy, 10-12 minutes.

        Photo Oct 23, 5 39 55 PM.jpg
        Add to your Day of the Dead party by finding a festive store bought chocolate and meringue tart and decorate it with traditional marigold flowers.

        Add to your Day of the Dead party by finding a festive store bought chocolate and meringue tart and decorate it with traditional marigold flowers.

        THE PARTY'S OVER. NOW WHAT?

        The best treat of all are the sweet things you remember about a great dinner party. When you relax, open up, share laughs and good food, you're ready for what's next.

        Which is either a good night's sleep, or, for some of us, planning Thanksgiving.

        With fewer skulls and spiders. 

        Perhaps.

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        And now, to thank you for signing up for a PDF of this Halloween Must-Have Party Tips, a few more pictures to whet your monstrous appetite. Enjoy!

        A PARTY GHOUL'S DELIGHT, WITHOUT THE NIGHTMARE OF COOKWARE CLEANUP.

        Click on the bread knot below to see the secret Halloween pictures we captured. 

        COMPLETE THANKSGIVING MENU AND RECIPE GUIDE

        COMPLETE THANKSGIVING MENU AND RECIPE GUIDE

        A SIMPLE THANKSGIVING PREP WITHOUT COMPROMISE. 

        Last week's Recipe of the Week was filled with great ideas about taking Thanksgiving side dishes up a notch. But not every dish -- nor every Thanksgiving -- needs to be a sophisticated variation on a traditional theme. There's a reason we all love Thanksgiving, and it comes down to comfort. And while putting together any Thanksgiving takes time and effort, it's all better when you have a plan.  

        But first: I know some of you reading this are not the designated chef this time around. But you can bring things to your host's home (check with them first, of course) -- or organize a pot luck if you want the day to be giddy fun and silly simple.

        So, without further ado, I've got good, simple approaches to the turkey day hit parade. 

        DRESSING THAT TASTES LIKE FALL

        In my variation on a sausage and cranberry dressing, I add some rendered bacon fat. It keeps the dressing moister and rounds out the savory goodness. 

        SAUSAGE AND CRANBERRY DRESSING

        • 16 cups 1-inch bread cubes, white or sourdough (1-1/2 pound loaf)

        • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter

        • 2 cups medium-diced yellow onion (that's about 2 onions)

        • 1 cup medium-diced celery

        • 2 Granny Smith apples, cored and chopped roughly

        • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley

        • 3 Tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves

        • 1 tablespoon kosher salt

        • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

        • 1/2 pound diced bacon

        • 3/4 pound sweet or spicy Italian sausage, casings removed

        • 1 cup chicken stock

        • 1 cup dried cranberries

        You'll want to plan ahead for left-overs ... buy a lot of cranberries at the store. This savory cranberry on a slice of turkey on lettuce and bread. Cranberry sauce has half the sugar, and incorporates caramelized onion. See our Instagram link here.

        You'll want to plan ahead for left-overs ... buy a lot of cranberries at the store. This savory cranberry on a slice of turkey on lettuce and bread. Cranberry sauce has half the sugar, and incorporates caramelized onion. See our Instagram link here.

        PROCEDURE

        1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.

        2. Place the bread cubes in a single layer on a sheet pan and bake for 7 minutes. Raise the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Remove the bread cubes to a very large bowl.

        3. Meanwhile, in a large saute pan, melt the butter and add the onions, celery, apples, parsley, salt and pepper. Saute over medium heat for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are softened. Add to the bread cubes.

        4. In the same saute pan, cook the bacon until crisp, remove with a slotted spoon leaving the rendered bacon fat to cook the sausage over medium heat for about 10 minutes, until browned and cooked through, breaking up the sausage with a fork while cooking. Remove with a slotted spoon and **(reserve the rendered fat to add later).

        5. Add to the bread cubes and vegetables.

        6. Add the chicken stock and cranberries to the mixture, mix well, and pour into a 9 by 12-inch baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes, until browned on top and hot in the middle.

        CREAMY MASHED POTATOES

        This serves 4-6, but for my family, I alway's double or triple the "suggested" amount, 'cause I’m wacky that way. Plus -- and here's the main reason you cannot have too many mashed potatoes during the holidays -- you'll have leftovers for thickening up the pumpkin or butternut soup you'll make in the next days.

        Here's a happy EuroCAST Dutch oven, presenting this mashed potatoes recipe on the table, smug in the knowledge that it's good-looking and cleans up beautifully.

        Here's a happy EuroCAST Dutch oven, presenting this mashed potatoes recipe on the table, smug in the knowledge that it's good-looking and cleans up beautifully.

        • 3 pounds boiling potatoes, such as Yukon Gold

        • Kosher salt

        • 1 1/2 cups whole milk

        • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter

        • 1/2 cup sour cream

        • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper

        • 3 shallots sliced thin into rings

        • 2 Tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley

        PROCEDURE

        Peel the potatoes (really well if you like your mash with a purée texture, or leaving some skin on for extra flavor and a bumpy mouth-feel), cut them into cubes between 1" and 2", and place them in a large pot of boiling salted water. Simmer uncovered for 10 to 12 minutes, until the potatoes are fork-tender. Drain the potatoes in a colander and then return them to the pot.

        Meanwhile, heat the milk and butter in a small saucepan until the butter is melted.

        Using an immersion blender or hand-held mixer, break the potatoes up, and then reduce the blander/mixer speed to low, so you can slowly add the hot milk/butter mixture to make the potatoes creamy, without throwing hot potatoes out of the pot.

        Add the sour cream (or, optionally, some heavy cream or half-and-half), 2 teaspoons of salt and the pepper and whisk to combine. 

        Top with finely sliced shallots and parsley if you like.

        Serve hot.

        OH, YES. THE TURKEY

        We did our turkey at 12 pounds in the top of our EuroCAST double-roaster. The sides and top get a beautiful brown because of the extra exposure, and the "start super-hot, turn down after" approach makes sure the bird stays moist.

        We did our turkey at 12 pounds in the top of our EuroCAST double-roaster. The sides and top get a beautiful brown because of the extra exposure, and the "start super-hot, turn down after" approach makes sure the bird stays moist.

        The top of the EuroCAST double-roaster took a 12-pound turkey, big enough for a family of four to six people with ease.

        Most people eat Thanksgiving dinner longing for the side dishes, so you don't really have to pile on the protein.

        That means a smaller turkey can feed the gang well, and you'll still probably have leftovers for your turkey sandwich or ... well, stay tuned for leftover ideas in a subsequent Recipe of the Week.   

        TURKEY TALE

        I brought it to room temperature, patted it very dry (this is really important), and made sure everything was removed from inside the cavity.

        Here's what to do next.

        1. Heavily salt the cavity.

        2. Rub in olive oil, all over, and salt EVERYWHERE. Inside and out.

        3. Pepper outside. Ground black pepper is my preferred, and use it all over, but you can use it from a bottle or tin if it's fresh.

        4. Sprinkle dried sage and dried thyme all over it, without any bashfulness.

        5. Then, into the cavity, stuff a handful of fresh thyme, lemon, bay leaf, sage, a head of garlic.

        6. Truss the bird.

        7. Put it in the top of your EuroCAST double-roaster, and then place that on the bottom of the oven at 525F for 45 minutes. This is, in my head, like doing a hard sear, and will give the skin a glorious texture that will also keep it moist during the longer, lower cooking time.

        8. During that initial high-heat session, the turkey starts to render some fat. This is good.

        9. After 45 minutes, I turned the oven down to 375F.

        10. Time to start basting: I melted about 5 tablespoons of unsalted butter, and then basted the bird with that and its rendered juices from the bottom of the pan.

        11. Total cooking time is about 3 hours -- but use a thermometer. Birds vary, ovens vary. Find our EuroCAST to-do tip sheet below for guidance on cooking times that match your bird.

        12. You MUST let it rest. Must.

        13. Since you cannot eat it right away, build anticipation by basting it while it rests.

        14. At the end, shower it with some kosher salt.

        Your table can handle some "eye candy" -- fresh herbs, seasonal and/or beautiful unseasonal fruits -- even a lovely artichoke.

        Your table can handle some "eye candy" -- fresh herbs, seasonal and/or beautiful unseasonal fruits -- even a lovely artichoke.

        TURKEY GRAVY WITH THYME

        Gravy can be vexing. If you're feeling like it's all too much. You can find high-quality gravy other places -- just buy it and avoid the brain strain you'll get making what might be the only roux you make in 2019. That's OK. 

        If you're drinking white wine as you cook, you could spill a little into the gravy as you're heating it up. It can add a little brightness, and make it all yours.

        This recipe is one of my favorites from our friends at Bon Appétit.

        • Roasting pan with pan drippings from roasting turkey

        • ⅓ cup Wondra flour

        • ½ cup dry white wine

        • ½ bunch thyme

        • 4 cups roasted poultry stock

        • 2 teaspoons Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

        • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

        PROCEDURE

        My ceramic turkey gravy boat holds court. Got a problem? Dr. Gravyboat is a great listener. I tell him everything.

        My ceramic turkey gravy boat holds court. Got a problem? Dr. Gravyboat is a great listener. I tell him everything.

        1. Carefully tilt the turkey roasting pan and strain drippings into a measuring glass or small bowl; discard solids. Let settle, then skim fat from surface, reserving ¼ cup (you should have about ¾ cup drippings).

        2. Place roasting pan over 2 burners set to medium heat. Add reserved fat to pan and whisk in flour. Cook, whisking, until roux is deep golden brown and looks shiny and smooth, about 5 minutes (a richly browned roux will add much more flavor than a pale one). Whisk in wine and cook until almost evaporated, about 2 minutes. Whisk in thyme and reserved turkey drippings.

        3. Meanwhile, bring stock to a bare simmer in a small saucepan. Reduce heat and keep warm.

        4. Gradually ladle warm stock into roux, whisking until incorporated before adding more, and simmer (still whisking!) until thickened (it should coat the back of a spoon), 8–10 minutes. If you prefer a thicker gravy, simmer a few minutes longer.

        5. For a silky gravy, strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium saucepan. Stir in vinegar; season gravy with salt and pepper. Keep warm over low heat until ready to serve.

        CREAMED CORN

        Yes, that's creamed corn topped with garlic confit. As a regular reader of our recipes, you know all about garlic confit.

        Yes, that's creamed corn topped with garlic confit. As a regular reader of our recipes, you know all about garlic confit.

        I think creamed corn needs a PR makeover. Maybe it's the name ... it feels a bit namby-pamby. But when done right, it can be ridiculously delicious. To my mind, this version's use of thyme and garlic really make it sing. I use a lot of thyme in my holiday cooking. It tastes great and has a ton of health benefits. Which, given the number of holiday dishes using butter and heavy cream, is not a bad thing to add to the mix.

        Speaking of the delights of dairy: You can use 12 ounces of half-and-half in this recipe instead of the cream/milk combination. 

        Photo Nov 18, 3 21 43 PM.jpg
        • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter

        • 1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)

        • 8 fresh thyme sprigs

        • 6 ears yellow corn, shucked and kernels cut off

        • 1 cup heavy cream

        • 1/2 cup whole milk

        • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

        • 1/4-1/2 cup whole roasted garlic cloves

        • 1/4 cup finely chopped flat leaf parsley

        PROCEDURE

        1. In a large EuroCAST sauté pan, melt the butter over medium heat.

        2. Add the onion and thyme and saute about 4 minutes, or until the onion is tender and very pale golden.

        3. With the back of the fork, smash the garlic cloves to the skillet, stir in the corn, and then stir in the cream and milk.

        4. Bring to a simmer and simmer 3 to 5 minutes, or until the corn is heated through and a little tender, but with a little "tooth" (a crunchy resistance when biting into it -- you are tasting this, right?)

        5. Discard the thyme stems.

        6. Season the corn to taste with salt and pepper.

        When I do this, I top it with slow-roasted garlic confit. Then, to balance that savory, sweet confit flavor, I put a dashing splash of red pepper flakes.

        CHOCOLATE PECAN PIE

        The pie we previewed in our Instagram post, pecans, yes ... but with dark chocolate. Not following us? Get to it!  http://www.instagram.com/eurocastcookware .

        The pie we previewed in our Instagram post, pecans, yes ... but with dark chocolate. Not following us? Get to it! http://www.instagram.com/eurocastcookware.

        • 1 cup packed brown sugar

        • 1/3 cup butter, melted

        • 3/4 cup light corn syrup

        • 1/2 teaspoon salt

        • 3 eggs

        • 1 1/2 cups pecan halves or pieces

        • 1/2 cup shaved excellent quality bittersweet chocolate

        • 1 recipe pie crust (I'm persnickety about my crust, see below for my persnickety recipe for the pie crust)

        1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

        2. Mix corn syrup, eggs, sugar, butter, and vanilla using a spoon. Stir in pecans.

        3. Cover the bottom of the crust with the shaved chocolate.

        4. Pour filling into pie crust.

        5. Bake on center rack of oven for 60 to 70 minutes. Top should be set, if the top begins to brown and the center is still jiggly, cover loosely with foil and continue cooking until set.

        6. Cool for 2 hours or overnight before serving.

        Serve with whipped cream. Yes. Because.

        PIE CRUST RECIPE

        Perfect Pie Crust:

        This recipe makes two crusts. Because you're making two pies. Aren't you? You should. The chocolate pecan pie, of course, and then whatever family favorite pie everyone is clamoring for. (A friend of mine always make a chocolate chess pie from his aunt's recipe, who got it from her mother. Thinking you could trace that chocolate chess pie genealogy way back into Biblical times.)

        • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) very cold unsalted butter

        • 3 cups all-purpose flour

        • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

        • 1 tablespoon sugar

        • 1/3 cup very cold vegetable shortening

        • 6-8 tablespoons ice water

        PROCEDURE

        1. Dice the butter and return it to the refrigerator while you prepare the flour mixture.

        2. Place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse a few times to mix.

        3. Add the butter and shortening. Pulse 8 to 12 times, until the butter is the size of peas.

        4. With the machine running, pour the ice water down the feed tube and pulse the machine until the dough begins to form a ball.

        5. Dump out on a floured board and roll into a ball.

        6. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

        7. Cut the dough in half.

        8. Roll each piece on a well-floured board into a circle, rolling from the center to the edge, turning and flouring the dough to make sure it doesn't stick to the board.

        9. Fold the dough in half, place in a pie pan, and unfold to fit the pan.

        10. Repeat with the top crust.

        HOMEMADE MARSHMALLOWS

        I unabashedly present to you Martha Stewart's homemade marshmallows. 

        Why marshmallows? Once you make them, you'll never run out of ideas -- or excuses. I, for example, found them to be a perfect topping for my double-spiced pumpkin pie. 

        About that crackly goodness on top ... it's caramelized sugar that tastes intensely sweet and dark. And looks like a fantasy dessert topping. Seriously great. 

        Photo Nov 18, 4 30 39 PM.jpg
        IMG_7409.jpg
        1. Brush a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish with oil. Line with parchment, allowing a 2-inch overhang on the long sides. Brush parchment with oil; set aside.

        2. Put granulated sugar, corn syrup, salt, and 3/4 cup water into a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Cook, without stirring, until mixture registers 238 degrees on a candy thermometer, about 9 minutes.

        3. Meanwhile, put 3/4 cup cold water into the bowl of an electric mixer; sprinkle with gelatin. Let soften 5 minutes.

        4. Attach bowl with gelatin to mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. With mixer on low speed, beat hot syrup into gelatin mixture.

        5. Gradually raise speed to high; beat until mixture is very stiff, about 12 minutes.

        6. Beat in vanilla.

        7. Pour into prepared dish, and smooth with an offset spatula.

        8. Set aside, uncovered, until firm, about 3 hours.

        9. Sift 1 cup confectioners' sugar onto a work surface. Unmold marshmallow onto confectioners' sugar; remove parchment.

        10. Lightly brush a sharp knife with oil, then cut marshmallow into 2-inch squares.

        11. Sift remaining 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar into a small bowl, and roll each marshmallow in the sugar to coat.

        Marshmallows can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature between sheets of parchment paper dusted with extra powdered sugar for up to 3 days.

        The untossed version of a tossed salad people will die for. Baby arugula, pine nuts, roasted carrots, diced shallots. The grape tomatoes have been sautéed with EVOO and S&P. And if you’re feeling frisky, toss in some crumbled goats cheese, or a really good stinky bleu cheese like St. Agar. Or even a good shredding of an aged smoky Gouda. GO CRAZY, MY PEOPLE! It’s just cheese. ♥️

        The untossed version of a tossed salad people will die for. Baby arugula, pine nuts, roasted carrots, diced shallots. The grape tomatoes have been sautéed with EVOO and S&P. And if you’re feeling frisky, toss in some crumbled goats cheese, or a really good stinky bleu cheese like St. Agar. Or even a good shredding of an aged smoky Gouda. GO CRAZY, MY PEOPLE! It’s just cheese. ♥️

        Fresh-baked, or bought at your favorite high-end bakery, bread should not be an afterthought. Our turkey in the pic above, however, is on a low-carb diet and so has turned his back on the idea. Oh, well, more for me.

        Fresh-baked, or bought at your favorite high-end bakery, bread should not be an afterthought. Our turkey in the pic above, however, is on a low-carb diet and so has turned his back on the idea. Oh, well, more for me.

        DINNER IS SERVED.

        The table should have food, good linens, and little touches to the delight the senses. Grapes, walnuts, a nice napkin ring. These are a few of my favorite things. (Do I hear a waltz? Yes.)

        The table should have food, good linens, and little touches to the delight the senses. Grapes, walnuts, a nice napkin ring. These are a few of my favorite things. (Do I hear a waltz? Yes.)

        Mmmmm. Pie. David Mamet once said there can be no stress where there is pie. Unh huh..

        Mmmmm. Pie. David Mamet once said there can be no stress where there is pie. Unh huh..

        Roast Duck with Thyme-scented Potatoes and Goat Cheese Tart

        Roast Duck with Thyme-scented Potatoes and Goat Cheese Tart

        image

        A simple 3 cheese and dried fruit board, an easy but decadent roast duck leg and potato one pot wonder, with garlic and fresh thyme in the mix. A delightful savory tart of spring goodies like sweet-peas and leeks. A dessert of angel food cake with white chocolate ganache. And the most charming and perfectly executed heart-shaped sugar cookies with your coffee this morning, or the next.

        First up, the cheese trio. Creamy, buttery goats milk brie, a good strong nose of the St. Agur, and the tangy sweetness of Humboldt fog. Paired with dried pitted Madjool dates, dried cranberries and a crusty loaf, all works well with your favorite bubbly or a dry martini.

        ROASTED DUCK LEGS WITH THYME SCENTED POTATOES 

        (ONE PAN RECIPE)

        Duck Legs and thyme and garlic scented potatoes. A sumptuous but easy one pot wonder

        Crisp braised duck legs with potatoes and onions is a simple, luxurious and decadent one pot dish. You’ll need one or two leg quarters per person, same with the potatoes. I use rose-gold because they are creamy and just petite enough to snug up into our 10” high sided pan along side the duck legs.

        1. Bring duck legs to room temperature, pat dry and salt generously.
        2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil, or rendered duck fat if you swing that way over medium high heat in your EuroCAST sauce pan, or our 10” high sided pan. This is an important step in getting the crispy on that duck skin. Brown on all sides until golden - approx. 9-10 minutes on each side.
        3. Slice potatoes into thick wedges and add to shallow mixing bowl, season well with kosher salt and fresh black pepper
        4. Quarter 1 large white onion, keeping the root end intact and add to the potatoes
        5. Add to the potatoes: 6 cloves of garlic cut into slices, and 2 tablespoons of fresh thyme leaves
        6. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the potatoes and garlic and thyme. With clean hands…:) mix the potatoes with the aromatics thoroughly.
        7. Tuck the potatoes, onions and their companions into and around the duck legs - which is skin side up in the pan.
        8. Add stock to the pan, it should just come to the halfway mark of the duck leg. Do not cover them with stock.
        9. Preheat the oven to 400
        10. Cook the duck for 25-30 minutes, then lower the heat to 325 until the liquid has reduced and the duck is done, or fork tender.
        11. Serve with the potatoes, onions and a bit of the juice. Garnish with fresh thyme leaves and flaky sea salt. 

        SAVORY TART

        I love this tart, it’s goat cheese, sautéed leeks, torn portobellos and sweet-peas all on a flakey, easy out of the freezer Puff Pastry crust.  Click here for the Instagram post and recipe.

        sweetpea tart vday rotw.jpg

        HOMEMADE CHICKEN LIVER PATE

        Chicken liver pate is one of those rare treats that adds a perfect little homemade yummy to the cheese board. Plus, look how gorgeous it pairs with a martini.

        This is ridiculously easy.

        1. Start with great quality chicken livers from your best grocer.

        2. Sauté 3 chopped shallots, 4 cloves garlic in 3 T olive oil in your EuroCAST skillet

        3. Add:

        • 1 lb. chicken livers
        • 1/4 tsp salt
        • 1/8 tsp black pepper
        • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves

        4. Sauté each side until browned and firm to the touch (approx. 5 minutes)

        5. Add:

        • 3 Tbsp butter to melt then remove from heat
        • Add into a bowl to cool with 2 T. chopped parsley and the juice of 1 lemon

        6. Let cool then blitz in food processor until smooth

        7. Pack into ramekins or a glass jar to set two hours or overnight.